WTF ………PlayStation Move Commercial

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Japan builds world’s most powerful supercomputer

A Japanese computer has taken first place on the Top 500 supercomputer list, ending China’s reign at the top after just six months. At 8.16 petaflops, the K computer is more powerful than the next five systems combined.

The K computer’s performance was measured using 68,544 SPARC64 VIIIfx CPUs each with eight cores, for a total of 548,352 cores, almost twice as many as any other system on the Top500 list. The computer is still under construction, and when it enters service in November 2012 will have more than 80,000 SPARC64 VIIIfx CPUs according to its manufacturer, Fujitsu.

Japan’s ascension to the top means that the Chinese Tianhe-1A supercomputer, which took the number 1 position in November last year, is now in second spot with its 2.57 petaflops. But China continues to grow the number of systems it has on the list, up from 42 to 62 systems. The change at the top also means that Jaguar, built for the US Department of Energy (DOE), is bumped down to third place.

The latest iteration of the bi-annual list was released Monday at the 2011 International Supercomputing Conference.

Unlike other recent supercomputers, the K computer doesn’t use graphics processors or other accelerators. It uses the most power, but is also one of the most energy efficient systems on the list, according to Top500.org. The supercomputer is installed at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) in Kobe. When complete, it is intended to run at over 10 petaflops.

This is the first time Japan has had the most powerful supercomputer since the country’s Earth Simulator was surpassed by the DOE’s IBM BlueGene/L and by Nasa’s Columbia in November 2004.

For the first time, all of the top 10 systems achieved performance over 1 petaflop, although they are the only systems on the list that reach that level. The US has five systems in the top 10, Japan and China have two each and France has one.

The DOE’s Roadrunner, the first system to break the petaflop barrier in June 2008, is now in tenth place. The performance of computers on the list is measured using the Linpack benchmark, a set of routines that solve linear equations.

The last system on the new list was at position 262 six months ago, meaning almost 48 percent of the list has changed in the last six months, and the turnover rate has steadily increased during the last few lists, according to Top500.org which publishes the list. While performance at the top is advancing by leaps and bounds, movements lower down the list are more modest. The entry point for the top 100 increased to 88.92 teraflops from 75.76 teraflops six months ago.

IBM is the dominant manufacturer on the list with 213 systems in the Top 500, compared to HP with 153.

Intel continues to provide the processors for a majority of the systems on list, followed by AMD and IBM. Intel’s Westmere processors are now used by 178 systems, up from 56 systems 6 months ago.

The Top 500 list is compiled by Hans Meuer of the University of Mannheim, Erich Strohmaier and Horst Simon of NERSC/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Jack Dongarra of the University of Tennessee.

Mega Collection Of Cheatsheets for Designers & Developers

Mega Collection Of Cheatsheets for Designers & Developers

Cheatsheets and various quick reference guides are available for almost any type of software and language these days. Unfortunately they’re not always easy to find when you actually need them. This is why I decided to take some time to gather up as many as possible and share them with you here!

Hopefully this can be a timesaver for you, along with teaching you a new trick or two. The resources have been divided into various categories to make them easier to find. Below are more than 100 cheat sheets and reference cards for the following topics:

CSS

CSS3 Cheat Sheet ↓

CSS3 Cheat Sheet

CSS2 Visual Cheat Sheet ↓

CSS2 Visual Cheat Sheet

CSS Cheat Sheet (V2) ↓

CSS Cheat Sheet

Css Property Index ↓

Css Property Index

BluePrint CSS ↓

CSS BluePrint

HTML

HTML 5 Cheat Sheet ↓

HTML 5 Cheat Sheet

HTML5 Canvas Cheat Sheet ↓

HTML5 Canvas Cheat Sheet

HTML5 Glossary ↓

HTML5 Glossary

HTML Character Entities Cheat Sheet ↓

HTML Character Entities Cheat Sheet

Color Codes Matching Chart HTML (Convert CMYK, RGB Hex) ↓

Color Codes Matching Chart HTML

Javascript

JavaScript Cheat Sheet ↓

JavaScript Cheat Sheet

Javascript DOM ↓

Javascript DOM

JavaScript Reference Card ↓

JavaScript Reference Card

jQuery 1.4 API Cheat Sheet ↓

jQuery 1.4 API Cheat Sheet

jQuery selectors ↓

jQuery selectors

jQuery 1.3.2 ↓

jQuery 1.3.2

jQuery 1.3 ↓

jQuery 1.3

jQuery 1.2 ↓

jQuery 1.2

Mootools 1.2 Cheat Sheet ↓

Mootools 1.2 Cheat Sheet

Prototype Cheat Sheet ↓

Prototype Cheat Sheet

PHP

PHP & MySQL for dummies ↓

PHP & MySQL for dummies

PHP 5 Online Cheat Sheet v1.3 ↓

PHP 5 Online Cheat Sheet v1.3

PHP5 Cheat sheet ↓

PHP5 Cheat sheet

PHP Manual Quick Reference ↓

PHP Manual Quick Reference

Printable PHP Security Checklist ↓

Printable PHP Security Checklist

PHP Functions to work with MySQL ↓

PHP Functions to work with MySQL

MySQL

MySQL Cheat Sheet ↓

MySQL Cheat Sheet

Handy Cheat Sheet of MySQL Commands ↓

Handy Cheat Sheet of MySQL Commands

Color/Fonts/SEO

HTML Colors Cheat Sheet ↓

HTML Colors Cheat Sheet

RGB Hex Colour Chart ↓

RGB Hex Colour Chart

Web Safe Color Chart ↓

Web Safe Color Chart

The Browser-Safe Colors ↓

The Browser-Safe Colors

Megapixels Chart (and print size) ↓

Megapixels Chart (and print size)

Points to pixels conversion ↓

Points to pixels conversion

Web Safe Fonts v2 (including Google API) ↓

Web Safe Fonts v2 (including Google API)

25-point Website Usability Checklist ↓

25-point Website Usability Checklist

Webdesign for dummies ↓

Webdesign for dummies

The Web Developer’s SEO Cheat Sheet ↓

The Web Developer's SEO Cheat Sheet

SEO for dummies ↓

SEO for dummies

Will the browser apply the rule(s)? ↓

Will the browser apply the rule(s)

When can I use? Compatibility tables (html5, css3 + +) ↓

When can I use? Compatibility tables (html5, css3 + +)

CMS

WordPress Help Sheet ↓

WordPress Help Sheet

The Advanced WordPress Help Sheet ↓

The Advanced WordPress Help Sheet

WordPress Theme Development Checklist ↓

WordPress Theme Development Checklist

WordPress Template Tags ↓

WordPress Template Tags

WordPress Optimization Cheat Sheet ↓

WordPress Optimization Cheat Sheet

SEO for WordPress ↓

SEO for WordPress

Drupal 7: The database ↓

Drupal 7: The database

Drupal 6 API Cheat Sheet ↓

Drupal 6 API Cheat Sheet

Drupal for dummies ↓

Drupal for dummies

Joomla 1.5 Basic Template Cheat Sheet ↓

Joomla 1.5  Basic Template Cheat Sheet

Joomla for dummies ↓

Joomla for dummies

Softwares

ActionScript 3.0 ↓

ActionScript 3.0

Adobe Flex3 ↓

Adobe Flex3

Adobe Air Cheat Sheet ↓

Adobe Air Cheat Sheet

Adobe Acrobat 9 Shortcuts ↓

Adobe Acrobat 9 Shortcuts

Adobe Acrobat 8 Quick Reference ↓

Adobe Acrobat 8 Quick Reference

Adobe Flash CS5 & Flash Catalyst for dummies ↓

Adobe Flash CS5 & Flash Catalyst for dummies

Adobe Flash CS4 Shortcuts ↓

Adobe Flash CS4 Shortcuts

Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 – all in one for dummies ↓

Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 – all in one for dummies

Dreamweaver CS4 shortcuts ↓

Dreamweaver CS4 shortcuts

DreamWeaver CS3 Reference Card ↓

DreamWeaver CS3 Reference Card

Adobe Fireworks CS3 Quick Reference ↓

Adobe Fireworks CS3 Quick Reference

Adobe After Effects CS4 Cheat Sheet ↓

Adobe After Effects CS4 Cheat Sheet

Adobe Illustrator CS4 Shortcuts ↓

Adobe Illustrator CS4 Shortcuts

Adobe Photoshop CS5 – all in one for dummies ↓

Adobe Photoshop CS5 – all in one for dummies

Adobe Photoshop Shortcuts ↓

Adobe Photoshop Shortcuts

Photoshop Elements8 For Dummies ↓

Photoshop Elements8 For Dummies

Adobe Lightroom 2.0 Shortcuts ↓

Adobe Lightroom 2.0 Shortcuts

Adobe Indesign CS5 for dummies ↓

Adobe Indesign CS5 for dummies

Adobe InDesign CS4 Tools and shortcuts ↓

Adobe InDesign CS4 Tools and shortcuts

GIMP Quick reference ↓

GIMP Quick reference

Apple Final Cut Pro 5 ↓

Apple Final Cut Pro 5

QuarkXpress 8 ↓

3DS max 9 ↓

3DS max 9

Blender for dummies ↓

Blender for dummies

AutoCAD 2011 for dummies ↓

AutoCAD 2011 for dummies

Google Sketchup 7 for dummies ↓

Google Sketchup 7 for dummies

OpenOffice.org for dummies ↓

OpenOffice.org for dummies

Office 2010 – all in one for dummies ↓

Office 2010 – all in one for dummies

Browsers & OS

Mozilla Firefox Cheat Sheet ↓

Mozilla Firefox Cheat Sheet

Google Chrome Keyboard Shortcuts ↓

Google Chrome Keyboard Shortcuts

Internet Explorer 8 – quick reference card ↓

Internet Explorer 8 – quick reference card

Windows 7 Cheat Sheet ↓

Windows 7 Cheat Sheet

Windows Alt Codes ↓

Windows Alt Codes

Ultimate Switcher Guide: PC to MAC ↓

Ultimate Switcher Guide: PC to MAC

Mac OS X Keyboard Cheat Sheet ↓

Mac OS X Keyboard Cheat Sheet

Mac OS X Leopard – 200 productivity boosters ↓

Mac OS X Leopard – 200 productivity boosters

Macs All-in-one for dummies ↓

Macs All-in-one for dummies

Linux for dummies ↓

Linux for dummies

Ubuntu reference ↓

Ubuntu reference

Others/Miscellaneous

Ruby on Rails Cheat Sheet ↓

Ruby on Rails Cheat Sheet

Python Cheat Sheet ↓

Python Cheat Sheet

ASP/VBScript Cheat Sheet ↓

ASP/VBScript Cheat Sheet

ASP.net ↓

ASP.net

Regular Expression Cheat Sheet (.NET) ↓

Regular Expression Cheat Sheet (.NET)

Core C# and .NET Quick Reference ↓

Core C# and .NET Quick Reference

960 Grid System Cheat Sheet ↓

960 Grid System Cheat Sheet

Firebug Cheat Sheet ↓

Firebug Cheat Sheet

Tcp Ports List ↓

Tcp Ports List

VOIP Basics ↓

VOIP Basics

VI (Linux Terminal) Cheat sheet ↓

VI (Linux Terminal) Cheat sheat

Mathematica Keyboard Shortcuts ↓

Mathematica Keyboard Shortcuts

Country Codes – quick reference ↓

Country Codes – quick reference

User Centred Design ↓

User Centred Design

The Social Landscape (social media) ↓

The Social Landscape (social media)

Your Turn To Talk

I hope you found my list of cheatsheets/quick references useful. If I missed any or you have other feedback, please leave a comment. Also remember to share this post if you found it useful! 😉

How HTML5 Will Change The Way You Use The Web

What is HTML5? Some kind of really fancy link tag?

HTML5 is a specification for how the web’s core language, HTML, should be formatted and utilized to deliver text, images, multimedia, web apps, search forms, and anything else you see in your browser. In some ways, it’s mostly a core set of standards that only web developers really need to know. In other ways, it’s a major revision to how the web is put together. Not every web site will use it, but those that do will have better support across modern desktop and mobile browsers (that is, everything except Internet Explorer).

What Awesomeness ca I expect from HTML5?

The big, marquee changes in HTML5 have already made some headlines, thanks to browser makers like Google, Apple, Mozilla, and others picking them up and implementing them. The shortlist:

  • Offline storage: Kind of like “Super Cookies,” but with much more space to store both one-time data and persistent app databases, like email. Actually, you can think of offline storage as something a lot like Google Gears—you just won’t need to install a plug-in to reap the benefits.
  • Canvas drawing: Sites can mark off a space on a page where interactive pictures, charts and graphs, game components, and whatever else imagination allows can be drawn directly by programming code and user interaction—no Flash or other plug-ins required.
  • Native video and audio streaming support: It’s in the very early stages and subject to format disruption, but sites like YouTube and Pandora could one day skip Flash entirely to bring you streaming audio and video, with timed playback and other neat features.
  • Geo-location: Just what it sounds like, but not limited to a single provider’s API or browser tool. HTML5 can find your location and use it to tailor things like search results, tag your Twitter updates, and more.
  • Smarter forms: Search boxes, text inputs, and other you-type-here fields get better controls for focusing, validating data, interacting with other page elements, sending through email, and more. It may not sound that sexy, but it could mean less annoyance as a user, and that’s always a good thing.
  • Web application focus: Without breaking down the hundreds of nuts and bolts, it’s fair to say that HTML5 is aimed at making it easier to build wikis, drag-and-drop tools, discussion boards, real-time chat, search front-ends, and other modern web elements into any site, and have them work the same across browsers.

Where can I see HTML5 in action?

Ooh, good question!

From this page right here, with a soon-to-be-optional-maybe-Flash, you can check out these video demonstrations:

Google I/O 2009 Keynote, pt. 1

Firefox 3.5 Treats Videos Like Web Pages:

If you’re running an up-to-date version of Firefox, Safari, Chrome, or Opera—or, basically, any regularly updated browser besides Internet Explorer—give these links a shot.

HTML5 Demos: Huge list of capability demonstrations, gracefully compiled by Remy Sharp.

Welcome to Safari: Written entirely with HTML5 and CSS 3.

YouTube in HTML5: No Flash required at all (for Chrome and Safari only, at this point).

Canvas drawing and audio

Neat interactive site that shows tweets from folks who are digging on HTML5, with streaming background audio and interactive data pieces.

Why is it being pushed? Don’t Flash and JavaScript already work?

Make no mistake, HTML5 has much love for JavaScript and its many relatives—in fact, the new markup standards make it easier for JavaScript-type code to point at, and pull from, pieces of each web page. As for Flash, and Silverlight, and other browser plug-ins, well, they are artificial solutions for a natural problem that HTML5 is trying to fix: Placing and managing interactive elements on a web page.

Besides being a major source of browser memory leaks and crashes, Flash and its brethren also doesn’t work on every platform, and has to be re-written and adapted for every new one. If you’re looking to make a clever application available to as many people as possible, a write once, use everywhere system is ideal. When more browsers and developers support HTML5′s audio, video, and interaction standards, the idea of the web as the universal app store—for smartphones, for desktops and laptops, Windows, Mac, and Linux—gets closer to reality.

Apple tried to pitch this mentality to developers with their first iPhone release. That pronouncement was, to put it mildly, roundly mocked. Since then, webapps have become a lot more powerful and respectable as mainstays of productivity, and enthusiasm for the walled garden model of application markets has waned quite a bit in the minds of an increasing number of developers.

That’s not to say that HTML5-powered web applications, with their lack of serious local storage, hardware access, and serious offline capabilities, are going to make the iPhone App Store, the Android Market, or the desktop software we’re all used to obsolete. But look at how Chrome is positioning its Chrome OS for netbooks, which relies on HTML5 for offline storage: A secondary computer, in terms of hard-and-fast capabilities, but one you might use just as often, if not more, for the web-connected convenience.

How will HTML5 makes its way onto my web?

HTML5 isn’t a software release, or a web development law. It’s a voted-upon and group-edited standard, written in broad fashion to accommodate different styles of development and the different thinking among web browser makers.

Put more simply, it depends on what you’re using to surf. And what standards your web makers are following.

Firefox, Safari and Chrome on the desktop support a few of the styles and features outlined in HTML5′s draft specifications, like offline storage, canvas drawing, and, most intriguingly, tags for audio and video that allow sites to stream multimedia files directly into a browser. Apple’s Safari for iPhone and the Android browser also support elements of HTML5, as does Opera Mobile. Want to know the nitty-gritty of where your browser stands on HTML5? Web geeks have put in the time to put it all in a Wikipedia chart.

Those audio and video tags aren’t quite as liberating as they may seem. The writers of the HTML5 standard—Ian Hickson of Google and Davd Hyatt of Apple—wanted to define a single, standardized format for video streaming, but while their employers favour the H.264/MPEG-4 standard, open-source firms like Mozilla can’t abide by its patent “encumbrance”, and Opera and other web firms don’t particularly love the licensing costs. Their alternative is Theora, better known (relatively) as Ogg Theora. As it stands, HTML5 simply doesn’t require or suggest a single container format or codec to use, which could mean browser-by-browser differences down the road. Ars Technica has a good explainer on the HTML5 video codec debate.

Apple’s iOS 4 hardware encryption has been “officially ” cracked ..

Apple’s iOS 4 hardware encryption has been cracked

Russian company ElcomSoft is claiming to have cracked the 256-bit hardware encryption Apple uses to protect the data on iOS 4 devices, and is offering software that allows anyone to do it.

ElcomSoft is well-known as a corporate security and IT audit company, working with law enforcement agencies, the military, and intelligence agencies to recover data and perform forensics on devices. Its latest work has managed to open up the data stored on any device running iOS 4 by circumventing the hardware encryption chip Apple uses.

Rather than relying on a hardware dump from such a device, which will be encrypted amd may be missing some of the important data a forensic investigation needs, ElcomSoft can now gain full access to what is stored on a gadget such as the iPhone 4. This includes historical information such as geolocation data, browsing history, call history, text messages and emails, usernames, and passwords. They can even recover data deleted by the user from the device.

Until now, anyone running an iOS 4 device has been safe in the knowledge their data was protected and the encryption too strong to be cracked in any usable timeframe. What ElcomSoft did was to create a toolkit that allows for the extraction of the encryption keys from such a device. With those keys it’s possible to decrypt an image taken from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. Once that is done a forensic tool such as FTK or Guidance EnCase can be used to look at the data in great detail.

Gaining access to the stored data on the device does not take long due to the ElcomSoft tools taking full advantage of the GPU or multiple GPUs in a system. However, you need access to the device in order to decrypt the data, not just an encrypted image from a device. This is because ElcomSoft brute-force the passcode which has to be done on the device, and with something like an iPhone 4 that takes around 40 minutes to achieve.

ElcomSoft offer this iOS 4 forensic toolkit to security and law enforcement agencies, but anyone can purchase the software to extract the encrypted data on a device. The application is called the ElcomSoft Phone Password Breaker and costs around $320 for the Professional edition. The speed of decryption on a home PC depends on your setup with Password Breaker supporting up to 32 CPUs and 8 GPUs.

17 Essential Linux Resources That You Shouldn’t Miss

Linux is one of my favorite topics… Today, I will be covering a A Wide Collection of Linux Apps which include Image Viewers, Video Editors, News Aggregators, Backup Tools & Guides etc. Credit goes to all the people who have put maximum effort to gather these various application in their own specific categories.  You may also want to check out our “Linux” Category for more awesome stuff.

Top 10 Free Video Editors for Ubuntu Linux

avid

20 Must Read HOWTOs and Guides for Linux

linux

10 Free Linux Ebooks For Beginners

linux_penguin

21 of the Best Free Linux Backup Tools

backup

Top 5 Gmail Notifiers for Linux

gmail-notifier

11 Free Windows Programs Alternatives For Linux

linux-windows

10 Best Image Viewers for Linux

imageieer

10 Must-Have Linux Web-Based tools

ubuntu

Top 10 KDE4 Applications

ubuntulinux

5 Best Linux Distributions

linux-distribution-time-line

7 Awesome 3D Graphic Design Applications for Linux

3d

13 Of the Best Linux Tutorials and OpenCourseWare on the Web

linux_opencourseware

12 of the Best Free Linux News Aggregators

adni18_linux_202_bigprev

10 Best Linux Audio players

linuxaudio

23 Useful System Applications for Linux

loin

42 of the Best Free Linux Games

linuxgames

5 Best Free Antivirus Software for Linux

antivirus