Gretchen loves Pink fluffy Unicorns

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27 Exact Dates for the End of the World.

  1. 70 AD: the fall and desecration of Jerusalem ended the world, according to the Preterists. Whoops.
  2. 500: Hippolytus of Rime worked out the Biblical ’6,000 year rule’ to apply to this year. For more fun with that same figure, keep reading.
  3. 989: Halley’s Comet always brings impending doom. Just ask Mark Twain.
  4. 1000: very little of an apocalyptic nature happened this year, aside from a bunch of Christians getting worked up about the rather flexible millennium date.
  5. 1874: the Jehovah’s Witnesses begin a long and lucrative career of predicting Armageddon, starting with this year. BTW: it didn’t happen.
  6. 1878: It didn’t happen this year, either.
  7. 1881: no, really…the JW’s were on a roll.
  8. 1910: again? Well, if you Witnesses say so.
  9. 1914: people are probably starting to wonder about Jehovah’s Witnesses.
  10. 1918: we like the four-year cycle, but could the Jehovah’s Witnesses maybe split it up into a summer apocalypse and a winter apocalypse?
  11. 1925: about this time, people may be forgiven for hoping that the world ends just to shut the Jehovah’s Witnesses up about it.
  12. 1975: they gave us a 50-year break (which included WWII, which was chock full of apocalyptic signs) but those scrappy Jehovah’s Witnesses aren’t done yet.
  13. 1982: “The Christ is Now Here”, according to the Tara Center, who later state that He’s not ready to reveal himself after all.
  14. 1984: Orwell buffs and Jehovah’s Witnesses alike considered this to be a significant year. Unless Van Halen is the antichrist (not unproven), they were probably all wrong.
  15. 1994: Nostradamus tries posthumously to beat the Jehovah’s Witnesses record for most failed predictions. Luckily, he’s much more vague and obscure, so he’s never really wrong
  16. 1997: No, really, the Christ is Now Here, according to Share International (a.k.a. the Tara Center). Interestingly enough, The Christ (a.k.a. Maitreya) tops the list of several groups who believe him to be the Antichrist instead. Either way is okay with us — we still get apocalypse!
  17. 1998: This is the year, says Nostradamus and others (and maybe not even him). For example, Eli Eshoh proved that the Rapture was going to happen, and by golly, it did (didn’t you notice?). We’re still not sure who were raptured, but those of us Left Behind should watch out for 2028. Two ends of the world for the price of one? Good deal!
  18. 2000: the change of the millennium makes a great date for the End Times. However, even the Y2K Bug turned out to be little more than a minor inconvenience.
  19. 2003: Ah, those wacky Zetas. They seemed so sure, and now Nancy and the rest of the earthworm-eaters simply claim that the Pole Shift of May 15th, 2003 was some sort of smokescreen or conspiracy, and the real day is still coming. But they won’t say when.
  20. 2008 2009 2010 2011: The Lord’s Witnesses (absolutely NOT Jehovah’s Witnesses, despite strikingly obvious similarities) are pretty sure that it’s all over one of these years. Well, as long as there’s still a World War I veteran alive, we’ve got nothing to worry about…so at least a year or two. Additionally, Harold Camping of Family Radio is pretty sure it’s all over in May. Or maybe October. Either way, he’s 100% sure.
  21. 2012: a very popular choice lately (and will probably remain so, up until the end of December). The basis for this date is Mayan calendars, Nostradamus, and sunspot predictions — and possibly a savvy marketing campaign by the Cults and Survival Gear coalition.
  22. 2014: Hey, this one comes from a Pope, so it must be true. In 1514 Leo IX gave us 500 years. You’d think that would be long enough to get our act together, but noooooooo…
  23. 2017: and then there’s the “Sword of God Brotherhood” (great name) who will be the only ones surviving this year, tasked with repopulating the planet. Hopefully there’s a Sisterhood as well. Or not…
  24. 2028: Eli Eshoe again. Anybody left after the great Rapture of 2008 (remember that?) and the ensuing tribulation (i.e., now) has until 2028 to prove themselves. Get to work.
  25. 2240: the Talmud says that the world as we know it will only last 6,000 years, starting with the creation of Adam (which apparently happened about 5770 years ago…sorry, Lucy). The Talmud is pretty discouraging about how much fun our final two centuries are going to be, but the world after Armageddon should be very nice.
  26. 2280: the Qur’an gives us 40 more years than the Talmud, according to Dr. Rashad Khalifa and a computer-assisted numerical analysis of the holy text.
  27. 3797: this one comes from Nostradamus, but so have quite a few other dates (past and future). Just in case this was the year that he really meant, clear your schedule.

Thomas W the walmart computer technician .

How do I get rid of this annoying pop-up?

Every time I start up my (PC) computer, this “RebateInformer” window opens. It looks like this:http://www.flickr.com/photos/39887657@N02/3875388264/. I’ve already uninstalled the program using the “Add or Remove Programs” utility in the control panel. When I did that it told me not all of the program’s features were deleted and that they could be removed manually. How do I get rid of this thing?
Domestic…  

start button>>programs>>startup

remove stuff related to it if it exists there!!! 

run “msconfig” (without quotes)
goto startup tab, uncheck boxes related to the app!

It worked, but I downloaded it again somehow . What did i do wrong ?
Wow. Try reading your download/install before clicking the yes button. What good is a alarm on your house if you let the thief in ?Delete

Thomas W

By the way, for anyone who doesn’t know, in order to “run” something you must go to the start menu and click run. It’s usually at the bottom of the left column next to an icon of a zooming window.Report Abuse

Really ? Run? WOW!!! Just throw your computer off a bridge and do us all a favor .

Thomas W

Yes Really ! I didn’t know where run was . The computer didn’t come with instructions and Walmart didn’t have any spares .

Mysterious grand piano found on sanbar @ Key Biscayne, Florida

Here’s a mystery that gives a whole new meaning to the phrase “piano bar.”

A grand piano recently appeared on a sandbar in Biscayne Bay, about 200 yards from the Quayside condominiums off Northeast 107th Street. Whoever put it there placed it at the highest point of the sandbar so that it’s not underwater during high tide.

How and why the piano got there is a mystery. A grand piano weighs at least 650 pounds and is unwieldly to move, said Bob Shapiro, a salesman at Piano Music Center in Pembroke Park. “You don’t take it out there in a rowboat,” Shapiro said.

This much is clear, however: The piano isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. Unless it becomes a danger to wildlife or boaters, authorities have no plans to haul it away.

“We are not responsible for removing such items,” said Jorge Pino, a spokesman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. “Even a car can become a habitat for wildlife. Unless the item becomes a navigational hazard, the Coast Guard would not get involved.”

The marine patrols of both the North Miami Police Department and Miami-Dade Fire Rescue said the same thing.

From Quayside, the shape of the piano is visible to the naked eye, but with a pair of binoculars or a telephoto lense, seagulls can be seen landing on the instrument and water lapping at its legs.

Throwing away a grand piano may seem like a waste of money, but it may not be. In decent condition, a used grand piano would cost at least $3,000 to $4,000. But many pianos wear out from the literally tons of pressure on the internal parts, and cheaper models aren’t worth the cost of rebuilding.

“It could be worth nothing,” Shapiro said. “Pianos don’t grow old gracefully. They just wear out.”